How Endometriosis Causes Hip Pain

Endometriosis is a common gynecological problem that affects at least 11% of women. Although endometriosis can cause severe pelvic pain, at least half of all women with endometriosis don’t experience pelvic or menstrual pain.

Imagine that you have endometriosis without gynecologic-related pain. Then you suddenly develop hip pain without any evidence of a hip problem (because it’s caused by endometriosis).

Now you have a pain problem that creates a really confusing clinical picture because hip pain is seldom associated with endometriosis, whether or not your endometriosis is diagnosed.

As pain specialists, Florida Pain Medicine has the expertise to accurately identify the cause of your hip pain. More importantly, they can alleviate your pain even if you have extensive endometriosis by targeting the source of your pain: the pelvic nerves.

Here’s a rundown on how endometriosis causes hip pain and the solutions we offer at our offices in Wesley Chapel, Zephyrhills, Brandon, Riverview, Ormond Beach, Port Orange, and Palm Coast, Florida

About endometriosis

Endometriosis develops when tissues that normally line the inside of your uterus start to grow outside your uterus. Though there are several theories about how that happens, many medical experts believe that when you menstruate, a small amount of blood can travel backwards and go out the Fallopian tubes.

Endometrial cells from the uterine lining are carried out by the menstrual blood. Then the cells attach to organs and structures outside your uterus where they continue to grow. These patches of tissue are called endometriosis.

The tissues that make up endometriosis respond to monthly hormonal changes just as if they were still inside the uterus. As a result, they thicken with blood for several weeks and then shed the extra blood at the same time you menstruate.

How endometriosis causes hip pain

When patches of endometriosis bleed, the fluid stays inside your pelvic cavity, where it causes inflammation, scarring, and adhesions. These changes typically lead to general abdominal pain as well as abdominal pain before and during your periods.

However, your pelvic region contains a complex of nerves. As endometriosis grows and expands, it may directly affect these nerves or create scar tissue that presses against nerves. When endometrial lesions build around the nerves, they cause pain.

Where you feel the pain depends on which nerves are affected by the endometrial lesions, but one of the most common problems is hip pain. In some cases, your hip pain may radiate to the buttock.

Interventional medicine to relieve hip pain

If we’re the first providers to diagnose endometriosis, we encourage you to see your gynecologist for the appropriate treatment. It’s essential to get a thorough gynecological exam,  because endometriosis is one of the top causes of infertility.

In the meantime, we can help you get relief from your hip pain by targeting the nerves sending pain signals to your brain. Sensory nerves pick up pain signals from your hip and pelvic region and carry them to your spine. From there, the signals go to your brain.

We use treatments such as nerve blocks, radiofrequency ablation, and spinal cord stimulation to stop pain signals at your spine. When your brain fails to get the message, it doesn’t perceive the pain. As a result, your hip pain is significantly diminished.

You don’t need to keep suffering from hip pain. Our team at Florida Pain Medicine can get to the source of the problem and provide treatments that effectively alleviate the pain. To learn more, call one of our offices, or schedule an appointment online.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Is Joint Pain a Normal Part of Aging?

Your joints change as you age, but joint pain is not a normal part of aging. Unfortunately, many people just live with the pain because they think it’s part of life. Read on to learn the steps you can take to prevent or reduce joint pain.

Don’t Enter the New Year With Joint Pain

When it comes to joint pain, you can count on one thing: Without treatment, you have a better chance of the problem getting worse than better. If you start treatment now, you can enter the New Year with significantly less joint pain.

Behind Those Achy Hips

You may think of achy hips as a problem affecting older adults. However, adults of all ages struggle with hip pain as athletic injuries and repetitive stress are two of the top causes. Here’s a rundown on why you have hip pain.

5 Spine Health Tips for Working at a Desk

Anyone who sits most of the day while working at a desk has a high risk of developing a back or neck injury that turns into chronic pain. You can significantly lower your risk and protect the health of your spine by following our five tips.

Injured on the Job? We Can Help

In 2018, nearly 3 million people suffered a workplace injury. Many of them ended up with chronic pain or limited function that interfered with their ability to work or enjoy life. That’s where we can help.

Understanding Ganglion Cysts

Most people haven’t heard of ganglion cysts, yet they account for 60-70% of all masses or lumps on your wrist or fingers. Ganglion cysts can get large enough to affect your appearance and cause pain. Read on to learn about your treatment options.